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Safeguarding
Trinity County
Aviation
Trinity Center Airport/James E. Swett Field (O86)
 

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Trinity Center
Business Supporters

Pflueger's Custom Aircraft Panels

Bonanza King Resort

Trinity Center General Store

Trinity Lake KOA

Trinity Lake Resort
Trinity Center Marina

Scott Museum

These businesses proudly support TCPA

Trinity Center Swett Airport is located in the community of Trinity Center in the scenic northern portion of the County and lies adjacent to the Trinity Alps Wilderness and Trinity Lake. Trinity Center Airport is the most active airport in the county.

Trinity Center enjoys a small, year-round population (many of whom are pilots,) that increases during the summer vacation months. Local attractions include camping and hiking, mountain biking, boating, house boating, fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing, Scott Museum and sightseeing.

NOTICE TO AIRMEN
Effective August 1, 2014

Due to firefighting operations in the vicinity of Trinity Center Airport, please exercise extreme caution flying into or out of O86. It is an active helibase for firefighting helicopters, and the USFS has agree to not close the airport at this time, but pilots must be vigilant since helicopters may be on firefighting frequencies and miss your CTAF call.

Also, the parallel taxiway is closed. It is being used for firefighting helicopter operations

The following NOTAMs are in effect for the Trinity Center area. As always, check immediately before flight for any updates on the TFRs.

!RIU 08/013 O86 AIRSPACE FIREFIGHTING ACFT OPS WITHIN AN AREA DEFINED AS 5NM RADIUS OF SFC-4000FT 1408020047-1408070700

!RIU 08/018 O86 TWY A CLSD 1408022223-1408070700

For the 2013 season, KOA campground will provide transportation to and from the airport. The campground is a 1.7-mile walk from the airport tiedown area, has lots of tent campsites and is located on the lake just across the creek from the northwest end of the airport. KOA has a store, hamburger stand (burgers, sandwiches, pizza, etc.), pool, kids playground, and boat docks.

When you make your reservation, let them know that you will need to be picked up at Trinity Center Airport. Then call them the day before your arrival to confirm your ETA. See the Trinity Lake KOA website for campground and reservation information.

AWOS commissioned at O86 — 134.30 or 530-266-3220.

Trinity Center Airport is the cover story in the May/June 2006 issue of Pilot Getaways Magazine.

Local weather and webcam

AOPA Airport Support Network volunteer

Airport Information

Note: The popular (and calm-wind) runway is 14. This airport can get busy on weekends and holidays. Please make frequent position reports when arriving and leaving the area. And, make all standard runway movement announcements.

Runways 14/32
Surface Asphalt
Runway dimensions 3,215 feet in length, 50 feet wide
Elevation 2390 MSL
Fuel No
Tie downs 50
Communications CTAF 122.9
Oakland Center 132.2
FSS Rancho Murieta 122.4
Weather AWOS 134.30 or call 530-266-3220 or "KO86" on ADDS

Notes:

1) Runway 32, Right Traffic (all runway patterns over the lake)
2) Calm wind runway 14
3) 200-foot paved displaced thresholds are located at each runway.
4) No lighting. No night landings.
5) Avoid overflight of the town.
6) Windsock midfield on lake side of runway
7) Caution: 4' fence at approach end of runway 14

AirNav: Trinity Center

Area and Airport History

Trinity Center was established in 1851 and is now located 40 miles north of Weaverville, on Highway 3. The town is located on the old Scott Ranch. This rural town includes a grocery store, gas station, restaurants, Post Office and various services.

The current town site is actually the third site where the town has been located. The "original" Trinity Center was a mining town and was moved because of flooding and its proximity to good mining veins. The new town, "Old" Trinity Center, was 2 miles from the current town site. Old Trinity Center was covered with water in 1961 when the hydroelectric and water storage project created Trinity Dam and Lake. The original Scott Ranch homestead was also covered when the lake filled.

When the Trinity Lake level is low, you can still see the old runway while flying into Trinity Center. The runway is normally underwater, upriver, north of the current site.

Many of the Old Trinity Center buildings and homes were moved to the new town site in 1959--including the Oddfellows Hall at the corner of Scott and Mary, and are still in use today.

The early residents used Trinity River water to help them mine for gold and grow agricultural products. Today, water provides electricity and recreation. The water also provides irrigation for vineyards that produce award-wining wines, local agriculture and sustains livestock on some of the remaining ranches. Much of the water is diverted to the California central valley.

Annual Events and Current Happenings

The 3rd Saturday of July is the Trinity Lake Fest held adjacent to the airport at the Trinity Airport Resort. Check the Trinity Lake Fest website for details.

On the Sunday of Labor Day weekend the airport at Trinity Center is the focus of the "Trinity Lake Lions Fly-in & Bar-B-Q", with entertainment, craft fair and just plain fun.

From May to September, the Scott Museum is open and the many fine displays of items from local families show life more than 150 years ago.

See the NorthTrinityLake.com website for a local event calendar, and check the North Trinity Lake facebook page for happenings.

Who is James E. Swett?

Colonel James Swett (1920-2009), a longtime Trinity Center resident, became one of the top-scoring WW II Grumman F4U aces, with 15 1/2 victories in 94 missions in the Corsair. He had already earned the Congressional Medal of Honor flying the F4F Wildcat before switching to the F4U.

Leading a four-plane F4F section with VMF-221 on April 7, 1942, he shot down no fewer than 7 Japanese Val dive-bombers in an engagement over Tulagi Harbor, before taking a hit himself and ditching in the sea.

In all, Jim Swett flew 211 combat missions, 94 in Corsairs; made 120 carrier launches and recoveries; and in addition to his Medal of Honor, was awarded 6 DFCs and two Purple Hearts.

We are privileged to have had Jim in our community and to have our airport named in his honor.

Medal of Honor citation
As a F4U Corsair pilot
Colonel Swett's biography
The full story...